Medication Monitor



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Generic Name (Trade Name—Company)
Notes
  • February 1, 2011

    Uses:

    Treatment of postherpetic neuralgia

    This new once-daily formulation of gabapentin is designed to swell in the gastric fluid and gradually release the active drug. A dose of 1,800 mg/d resulted in a statistically significant reduction in average daily pain scores compared with placebo and was generally well tolerated. This new gabapentin formulation is not interchangeable with other gabapentin products because of differing pharmacokinetic profiles. The tablets will be marketed in 300-mg and 600-mg dosage strengths and will be available later this year.

  • February 1, 2011

    Uses:

    Treatment of breakthrough pain in adult patients 18 years of age or older with cancer who already use opioid pain medication around the clock and who need and are able to safely use high doses of an additional opioid medication

    A new formulation of fentanyl, sublingual immediate-release tablets, has been FDA approved in six different strengths: 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 800 µg; the 100-µg strength is recommended to be taken as the initial dose. Because serious adverse reactions, including death, have been reported with other immediate-release fentanyl transmucosal products, this product is available only through a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy program, which requires pharmacies, distributors, health care providers, and patients to enroll.

  • February 1, 2011

    Clonidine extended-release tablets and suspension have been approved by FDA. Both formulations are indicated to be taken once daily, either alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents. The tablets will be marketed in two strengths—0.17 mg and 0.26 mg—and the suspension will be available in a 0.09 mg/mL formulation.

  • February 1, 2011

    Uses:

    Treatment of acetaminophen overdose to minimize hepatic injury

    Cumberland announced that it has a new formulation of injection that does not contain ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid or any other stabilization and chelating agents and is preservative free. This new formulation will also have an extended shelf life of 30 months compared with 24 months for the original formulation.

  • January 1, 2011

    The vaccine is now approved by FDA for prevention of anal cancer caused by HPV types 16 and 18 and prevention of AIN grades 1–3 (anal dysplasias and precancerous lesions) caused by HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 in males and females 9 to 26 years of age. The vaccine was previously approved for prevention of cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers in females. The product was also licensed for prevention of genital warts in females and males.

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